Corneal diseases: Causes and Symptoms

Cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the pupil and the iris (that is, the colored part of the eye). Below you’ll find accurate descriptions about corneal diseases and injuries, artificial cornea, Boston Keratoprosthesis, corneal laser surgery, and also about the latest news on the minimally invasive or artificial corneal transplant. Definitions are given by Dr. Badalà, who works as an ophthalmologist in MIlan, Rome and Catania.

Cornea related injuries and diseases could be: cornea guttata, corneal dystrophy, corneal ulcer, keratoconus, corneal abrasion. All of these can lead to a loss of corneal transparency.

In these cases, the most common treatment consists in a corneal transplant, that makes it possible to see well again. If the disease is catched early, it is even possible to avoid the transplant altogether with a medical therapy.

If transplant fails, you can resort to artificial cornea, via the Boston Keratoprosthesis: the artificial cornea can give a new hope to many patients.

Cornea shields the inside of the eye just like the glass of a watch. It is composed of several layers; from the outside, there are, in order:

  • epithelium,
  • stroma,
  • endothelium.

Some corneal diseases affect the whole cornea, some others only the superficial part or the most inner layer (endothelium).

Some corneal disease have a genetic component and are linked to the patient’s family history; this is why, in case of relatives that have such diseases, it is best to see an ophthalmologist and, if that’s the case, diagnose corneal diseases early on.
This is even most advisable in case of cornea guttata or keratoconus, where genes responsible for the disease have been identified.

Francesca Cassa, Brescia (Montichiari)

Votazione: Eccellente
Many years ago, herpes virus left  me with a corneal scar. Over time, I alternated periods of "quiet" to relapses of various seriousness (included a corneal ulcer).

My eyesight has gradually worsened to about 1/10.
... Keep on reading this review
Most of the eye doctors I have consulted advised me against perforating corneal transplantation.

Then, I read on the internet about lamellar transplant technique. The first consultation (4 years ago at another medical center) left me with some concerns. Following the deterioration and difficulty in performing some simple tasks with one eye (e.g. drive), I tried again.

After having found the name of Dr. Badalà, I booked a visit. After preliminary tests I described the situation, he reassured me (I am a quite anxious person!). He proposed me the surgery, explaining the advantages, risks and prospects and I decided to undergo surgery, which was performed under general anesthesia.

The operation was successful, without any pain or postoperative problems (related to anesthesia).

After a few hours I already got up, the same day they removed my blindfold and I had already gained 1/10, how exciting!

The next day I was discharged, and I returned home by train.

I recovered my daily life immediately, with a few days of rest and appropriate care.

Now (six months after surgery) I am rigorously following therapy ,but I have no specific difficulties and obstacles (only some discomfort related to the sun and summer heat).

The eye is slowly improving, even someone asks me what has happened since the color is back like the other (before the opacity was so obvious that the two eyes seemed different color!) and at each check-up visual acuity earns some points (after six months I see 7/10 versus 1/10 in advance).

I thank Dr. Badalà for guiding me to this decision with the serenity which me and my family needed, and how he continues to guide me in the post-transplant course.
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