Corneal diseases: Causes and Symptoms

Cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the pupil and the iris (that is, the colored part of the eye). Below you’ll find accurate descriptions about corneal diseases and injuries, artificial cornea, Boston Keratoprosthesis, corneal laser surgery, and also about the latest news on the minimally invasive or artificial corneal transplant. Definitions are given by Dr. Badalà, who works as an ophthalmologist in MIlan, Rome and Catania.

Cornea related injuries and diseases could be: cornea guttata, corneal dystrophy, corneal ulcer, keratoconus, corneal abrasion. All of these can lead to a loss of corneal transparency.

In these cases, the most common treatment consists in a corneal transplant, that makes it possible to see well again. If the disease is catched early, it is even possible to avoid the transplant altogether with a medical therapy.

If transplant fails, you can resort to artificial cornea, via the Boston Keratoprosthesis: the artificial cornea can give a new hope to many patients.

Cornea shields the inside of the eye just like the glass of a watch. It is composed of several layers; from the outside, there are, in order:

  • epithelium,
  • stroma,
  • endothelium.

Some corneal diseases affect the whole cornea, some others only the superficial part or the most inner layer (endothelium).

Some corneal disease have a genetic component and are linked to the patient’s family history; this is why, in case of relatives that have such diseases, it is best to see an ophthalmologist and, if that’s the case, diagnose corneal diseases early on.
This is even most advisable in case of cornea guttata or keratoconus, where genes responsible for the disease have been identified.

Gianna Lo Castro, Siracusa (Lentini)

Votazione: Eccellente
A few years ago I discovered I had a quite rare disease called "Fuchs' dystrophy," which affects the cornea.

I had troubles driving and was always seeing through the fog. The fog was getting worse and worse, making it... Keep on reading this review difficult to distinguish different objects. I had great difficulty, even to watch TV.

I was considering myself on the way to blindness and was wondering how could I deal with my new "low vision status".  I did not give up and started looking around!

I finally found a specialist using cutting edge technology: Dr Badala. He explained me my condition and reassured me! Then he proposed a new corneal endothelium transplant called  DMEK. I finally decided and underwent surgery.

I faced some difficulties, like lying down supine for about 48 hours, but it was worth it! Now my low vision is just a memory!

I started to see immediately: everything was clear! I could even make out the pictures on TV! Coming back home, I saw my cat with its true colors in contrast: black and white, rather than an indefinite gray as before surgery !! So? !! ... Thanks a lot  Dr. Badalà!